Do clicks on Twitter really matter?

September 30, 2009

Having recently jumped into Twitter, I’m still trying to wrap my head around how to effectively measure follower interaction.

I’ve been using Hootsuite to manage the company’s Twitter accounts, @CDMmedia and @ITOAmerica. It allows me to go back and forth between the accounts as well as schedule tweets. It also allows me to track the number of clicks on the links I’ve posted. I check the click stats throughout the day, often using the numbers to gauge the quality of my tweets.

This raises the question, are clicks on Twitter an accurate form of measuring success and engagement?

Clicks signify that people are reading your posts and find your content valuable enough to take the time to find out more. However, the number of clicks a particular tweet receives is based on several of factors, including whether or not your followers are logged-on to Twitter. In other words, even if your post doesn’t receive a lot of clicks, that doesn’t necessarily make it a bad post. It could just be poorly timed. In this way, clicks seem like a faulty way to measure success.

With this in mind, I keep going back to Twitter’s original interface, which, to my knowledge, does not allow you to track clicks. Without a third-party application, I would have to measure interaction differently and would be more focused on retweets, direct messages, the number of followers and @replies.

In order to clearly answer this question, I need to define engagement within the realm of Twitter, which is a whole separate blog post. I suspect, however, that interaction should be measured in a variety of ways, including clicks and level of interaction with individuals.

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